Overview

Interventional Radiology at Overlake Medical Center

Interventional radiology is a recognized medical specialty by the American Board of Medical Specialties. Interventional radiologists are board-certified physicians with additional advanced training in minimally invasive, targeted treatments performed using imaging to guide them. Their board certification includes both Vascular and Interventional Radiology and Diagnostic Radiology which are administered by the American Board of Radiology.

Interventional procedures are performed in place of invasive surgical traditions utilizing image-guided, targeted treatments that improve outcomes, shorten recovery times, reduce complications and offer new methods of diagnosis and treatment.

Did You Know?

Twenty to 40 percent of women age 35 and older have uterine fibroids. Uterine Artery Embolization is a non-surgical treatment for this condition. 

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is the formation of a blood clot, known as a thrombus, in the deep leg vein. It is a very serious condition that can cause permanent damage to the leg, known as post-thrombotic syndrome, or a life-threating pulomnary embolism. In the United States alone, 600,000 new cases are diagnosed each year. One in every 100 people who develops DVT dies. Thrombolysis is a method of treatment for this condition. 

Approximately 700,000 vertebral, or spinal bone, fractures occur each year — usually in women over the age of 60. Researchers estimate that at least 25 percent of women and a somewhat smaller percentage of men over the age of 50 will suffer one or more spinal fractures. Of particular concern are spinal fractures caused by a progressive weakening of the bone -- a condition called osteoporosis. The pain and loss of movement that often accompany bone fractures of the spine are perhaps the most feared and debilitating side effects of osteoporosis. Vertebroplasty is a method of treatment for this condition. 

Interventional Radiology

Did you Know?

A registered technologist specializes in radiography and radiation physics. He/she must complete a two-year intensive program and successfully pass a written registry examination. Due to strict standards, hospitals often employ the most talented and skilled professionals in this field.

The physician with a subspecialty in a particular area offers the patient heightened insight and expertise. Subspecialty training gives the physician a greater breadth and depth of knowledge which benefits the patient.

Overlake is compliant with all the Federal privacy regulations of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA). The Overlake Privacy Statement is available on this website.

Locations

Overlake Medical Center
1035 116th Ave NE
Bellevue, WA

Medical Tower (Main Hospital Campus)
1135 116th Ave NE
Suite 110
Bellevue, WA

Issaquah
5708 E Lake Sammamish Pkwy SE
Issaquah, WA

Redmond
17209 Redmond Way
Redmond, WA

Parking

Parking is FREE at our Issaquah and Redmond sites. Parking is validated at our hospital locations.

Interventional Services

Interventional Services

The following is a list of the interventional radiology services offered at Overlake Medical Center.

Here we describe in detail the six most common procedures, how to prepare, follow-up care and what you need to know about the procedure.

    • Angiography
    • Venography
    • Angioplasty/Venoplasty Stents
    • Thrombolysis
    • Embolization
    • Uterine Artery Embolization
    • Stroke Intervention
    • IVC Filters
    • TIPS
    • Venous Access Devices
    • Interventional Oncology
    • Spinal Intervention
    • Vertebroplasty
    • Gastrointestional
    • Biliary
    • GU
    • Biopsy
    • Pain Therapy

    Angiogram / Angiography

    Angiogram / Angiography

    An angiogram is a specialized X-ray procedure that looks at the arterial blood vessels to identify any abnormalities. The arteries most frequently examined are the arteries found in the legs, neck, abdomen and head.

    The angiogram is done by placing a small catheter in a blood vessel, usually through a small nick in the skin. The catheter is placed in the artery that is to be examined, and the Interventional Radiologist injects a small amount of a contrast agent to make the arteries visible on X-ray.

    When Your Procedure is Scheduled

    1. Our scheduler will give you a date and time to arrive at the hospital.
    2. You will be scheduled to come in two hours before the procedure to allow the admitting staff and the nursing staff time to get you ready.
    3. Please let the scheduler know if you take Coumadin, Plavix, Insulin or Metformin. You will need to receive specialized instructions.
    4. Please notify us if you’ve had a previous reaction to contrast dye.
    5. The admitting department will attempt to call you the night before the procedure to confirm your arrival time.
    6. Please leave any jewelry and valuables at home.
    7. Make sure that you have a responsible person who can give you a ride home. You will not be able to drive yourself home.
    8. If you have any questions regarding your procedure you may call us at 425.688.5005.

    Preparation

    1. Do not eat or drink any fluids for four hours before your exam.
    2. Please take your normal heart and blood pressure medications with a sip of water.
    3. You need to be at hospital admitting two hours before you procedure’s scheduled start time. This is located at the large desk at the hospital’s main entrance (across from Stanza’s).
    4. You will be taken down to your room where you will meet your nurse. You will be asked to change into a patient gown, and then an IV will be started, as well as, blood drawn for lab tests. The nurse will ask you for your medical history.Bring a list of all medications you take and when you take them.
    5. The nurse will also ask you about allergies. If you are allergic to radiology/contrast dye, please let the nurse know.
    6. The nurse or tech will be shaving both groin areas.
    7. If there is a possibility that you’re pregnant, please let the nurse know.You will be asked to sign a form if you are of a childbearing age (12-57).
    8. Before the procedure, the interventional nurse will meet with you and your family in your room. He or she will review your procedure with you and answer any questions you might have.

    Procedure

    1. The procedure takes from one to three hours. You will meet the doctor who will go over the consent form and answer any questions you might still have.
    2. You will receive sedation medication during the procedure to help you relax.
    3. During the procedure you might feel warmth, tingling or flushing when you are given the contrast dye. This usually lasts about 10 seconds. During the procedure the nurse will be monitoring your heart, blood pressure and the oxygen level in your blood.
    4. Once the procedure is over you will be transferred back to your room. You may have a small catheter still in place in the artery in your groin.

    After the Procedure

    1. The nurse or tech will remove the small catheter and apply pressure for at least 15 minutes. You will be told to lie flat for up to six hours and to keep your leg straight. This is to prevent any bleeding or swelling.
    2. Your blood pressure, pulse and puncture site will be monitored frequently by the nurse.
    3. You will be encouraged to drink plenty of fluids to help wash the contrast out of your system. You will need to continue to drink fluids for the first 24 hours after your procedure, unless your physician has limited your fluid intake.
    4. Most patients will be discharged about six hours after procedure.
    5. You will be given written instructions and a phone number to call if you have any questions or concerns.
    6. One of the interventional nurses will do a follow-up call the next week-day after your procedure. Write down any questions you might have for them.
    7. To speak with an interventional nurse, please call 425.688.5005. It is best to call between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. You can leave a message on the voicemail, and a nurse will return your call as soon as they are able.
    8. If you are on Coumadin and have been told not to take it before your procedure, you need to check with your physician, and/or the Anti-Coagulation Clinic for specific instructions.
      If you are on Metformin/Glucophage, suspend usage of this medication until 48 hours after the procedure. Check with the physician who ordered it for when to resume taking it. Further lab work may be requested.
      If you an insulin-dependent diabetic, restart your regular dosing when you get home. Check your sugar regularly and if you have a concern, contact your diabetes doctor.
    9. Resume taking all your regular medications once you are at home.

    Angioplasty / Stent Placement

    Angioplasty / Stent Placement

    An Angiogram is a specialized x-ray procedure that looks at the arterial blood vessels to identify any abnormalities. The arteries most frequently examined are the arteries found in the legs, abdomen, head and neck.

    The angiogram is done by placing a small catheter in a blood vessel, usually through a small nick in the skin. The catheter is placed in the artery that is to be examined, and the Interventional Radiologist injects a small amount of a contrast agent to make the arteries visible on X-ray.

    If you have a blockage in the artery, the Interventional Radiologist will insert a small balloon attached to a catheter, into your artery. He will use X-ray to help guide the catheter to the area of the blockage. The balloon is inflated to open the artery up. Sometimes a tiny mesh-like tube, called a stent, is inserted to hold the blood vessel open. Once the artery has been enlarged, the balloon and catheter will be removed.

    When your procedure is scheduled

    1. Our scheduler will give you a date and time to be at the hospital.
    2. You will be scheduled to arrive two hours prior to the procedure. This is to allow the admitting and nursing staff time to prepare you for your procedure.
    3. If you take Coumadin, Plavix, Insulin or Metformin, please let the scheduler know so you can receive specialized instructions.
    4. Please notify us if you’ve had a previous reaction to contrast dye.
    5. The admitting department will call you the night before the procedure to confirm your arrival time.
    6. Please plan to leave any jewelry and valuables at home.
    7. Make sure that you have a ride home and will not be driving yourself.
    8. If you have any questions regarding your procedure you may call us at 425.688.5507.

    Preparation

    1. Do not eat of drink for four hours before your exam.
    2. Please take your normal heart and blood pressure medications with a sip of water.
    3. You need to arrive at hospital admitting two hours prior to your procedure. Admitting is located in the hospital’s Main Lobby (across from Stanza’s).
    4. Your will be taken down to your room where you will meet your nurse. You will be asked to change into a patient gown, and then an IV will be started and blood will be drawn for lab tests. The nurse will ask you for your medical history. Bring a list of all medications you take and when you take them.
    5. The nurse will also ask you about allergies. If you are allergic to radiology/contrast dye please let them know.
    6. The nurse or tech will be shaving both groin areas.
    7. If there is a possibility that you’re pregnant, please let the nurse know.You will be asked to sign a form if you are of childbearing age (12-57).
    8. Before the procedure, an interventional nurse will meet with you and your family in your room. He or she will review your procedure with you and answer any questions you might have.

    Procedure

    1. The procedure takes from one to three hours. You will meet the doctor who will go over the consent form and answer any questions you might still have.
    2. You will receive sedation medication during the procedure to help you relax.
    3. During the procedure you might feel warmth, tingling or flushing when you are given the contrast dye. This usually lasts about 10 seconds. During the procedure the nurse will be monitoring your heart, blood pressure and the oxygen level in your blood.
    4. Once the procedure is over you will be transferred back to your room. You may have a small catheter still in place in the artery in your groin.

    After the Procedure

    1. The nurse or tech will remove the small catheter and apply pressure for at least 15 minutes.
    2. Your blood pressure, pulse and puncture site will be monitored frequently by the nurse.
    3. You will be encouraged to drink plenty of fluids to help wash the contrast out of your system. You will need to continue to drink fluids for the first 24 hours after your procedure, unless your physician has limited your fluid intake.
    4. You may be kept in the hospital for a 24-hour period for observation. Otherwise you will be discharged in six to eight hours.
    5. You will be given written instructions and a phone number to call if you have any questions or concerns.
    6. One of the interventional nurses will do a follow-up call the next week-day after your discharge. Write down any questions you might have for them.
    7. To speak with an interventional nurse, please call 425.688.5005. It is best to call between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. You can leave a message on the voicemail, and a nurse will return your call as soon as they are able.
    8. If you are on Coumadin and have been told not to take it prior to your procedure, you need to check with your physician and/or the Anti-Coagulation Clinic for specific instructions.
      If you are on Metformin/Glucophage, suspend usage for 48 hours after your procedure. Check with the physician who ordered it for when to resume taking it. Further lab work may be requested.
      If you are an insulin-dependent diabetic, restart your regular dosing when you get home. Check your sugar regularly and if you have a concern, contact your diabetes doctor.
    9. You may resume taking all of your normal medications once you are home.

    Biopsy

    Biopsy

    A percutaneous biopsy is a procedure using a small needle to remove a piece of tissue from the affected organ or surrounding tissue. Examples of common areas biopsied are the lung, liver, kidneys, and adrenal glands. Biopsies are done for diagnostic purposes using either Computed Tomography (CT or CAT scan) or Ultrasound Imaging. When the doctor has ordered a biopsy, it is to help with the possible diagnosis of a disease process, cancer or infection.

    Risks:

    There are some risks that come with a biopsy. You may have bleeding or get an infection. You could also suffer a collapsed lung if having a liver or lung biopsy. But, if you do not have the biopsy, your physician may not know the best way to treat your illness. The Interventional Radiologist will explain this to you before the procedure and will answer any questions you might have.

    When your procedure is scheduled

    1. Our scheduler will give you a date and time to be in the hospital.
    2. You will be scheduled to come in two hours before the procedure; this is to allow the admitting staff and the nursing staff to get you ready.
    3. Please let the scheduler know if you take Coumadin, Plavix or Insulin.You will need to receive specialized instructions.
    4. Please notify us if you’ve had a previous reaction to contrast dye.
    5. The admitting department will attempt to call you the night before the procedure to confirm your arrival time.
    6. Please plan to leave any jewelry and valuables at home.
    7. Make sure that you have a ride home; you cannot drive yourself.
    8. If you have any questions regarding your procedure you may call us at 425-688-5507.

    Preparation

    1. Do not eat or drink for four hours before your exam.
    2. Please take your normal heart and blood pressure medications with a sip of water. You may also take any pain medication that your doctor prescribed.
    3. You need to be at the hospital’s admitting two hours before you procedure’s scheduled start time. This is located at the large desk at the hospital’s main entrance (across from Stanza’s).
    4. You will be taken down to your room where you will meet your nurse. You will be asked to change into a patient gown, and then an IV will be started and blood will be drawn for lab tests. The nurse will ask you for your medical history. Bring a list of all medications you take and when you take them.
    5. The nurse will also ask you about allergies. If you are allergic to radiology/contrast dye please let them know.
    6. If there is a possibility that you’re pregnant, please let the nurse know.You will be asked to sign a form if you are a female at a childbearing age (12-57).

    Procedure

    1. The procedure takes approximately 30 minutes to one hour. You will meet the doctor who will go over the consent form and answer any questions you might still have. He will look at your previous films and make the decision whether we will do your procedure in Ultrasound or CAT Scan.
    2. The Radiologist will numb the skin with a local anesthetic.
    3. You will receive sedation medication during the procedure to help you relax.
    4. During the procedure the nurse will be monitoring your heart, blood pressure and the oxygen level in your blood.
    5. The tissue that is taken will be sent to the lab for diagnosis. This will take about two to three days at which time a report will be sent to your physician.
    6. Once the procedure is over you will be transferred back to your room.

    After the Procedure

    1. You will have a small bandage that will be placed over the puncture site. You may remove this the next day.
    2. Your blood pressure, pulse and puncture site will be monitored frequently by the nurse.
    3. Most patients will be discharged about two to six hours after procedure, depending on the site that was biopsied.
    4. You can expect some mild tenderness at the site of the biopsy which should go away in a couple of days.
    5. You will be given written instructions and a phone number to call if you have any questions or concerns.
    6. One of the interventional nurses will do a follow-up call the next weekday after your procedure. Write down any questions you might have for them.
    7. To speak with an interventional nurse, please call 425-688-5005. It is best to call between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. You can leave a message on the voicemail, and a nurse will return your call as soon as they are able.
    8. If you are on Coumadin and have been told not to take it before your procedure, you need to check with your physician, and/or the Anti-Coagulation Clinic for instructions.
      If you are an insulin-dependent diabetic, restart your regular dosing when you get home. Check your sugar regularly and if you have a concern, contact your diabetes doctor.

    Special Instructions

    Lung Biopsy:

    Once you are discharged, call the radiologist or come into the emergency room if you develop any severe shortness of breath.

    Immediately after the biopsy you will have a chest X-ray to check for a pneumothorax. This is a small collapse of the lung. Approximately one out of three patients develops this which needs no treatment and resolves on its own. On rare occasion a tube will need to be placed inside the space around the lung to help re-inflate the lung. Follow-up X-rays are taken until the tube is removed.

    Liver Biopsy:

    You can expect some soreness at the incision site and possibly into your right shoulder. This discomfort should disappear within a few days. You may take an over-the-counter-painkiller for the discomfort, but please do not take aspirin or Ibuprofen for five days after procedure.

    If you develop a new onset of severe pain radiating to the right shoulder, please call Radiologist or come into the emergency room.

    Renal Biopsy:

    You can expect some tenderness at the incision site; this should gradually disappear within a few days. If you pass blood clots in your urine or develop flank pain, please call the radiologists immediately for further instructions. Please do not take aspirin or Ibuprofen for five days after procedure.

    Uterine Artery Embolization

    Uterine Artery Embolization

    Uterine fibroids are non-cancerous growths in the uterus that cause symptoms such as pain and heavy bleeding for some women. Uterine Fibroid Embolization (UFE) or Uterine Artery Embolization (UAE) is an approved, non-surgical treatment that causes the fibroids to shrink by blocking the arteries that feed them. This procedure has been performed in thousands of women and it has been shown to be a safe effective technique for the removal of the fibroids.

    This procedure is done by an experienced Interventional Radiologist. Using local anesthesia, he will make a tiny nick in the skin above the artery in your groin. Next he will insert a tube, and using fluoroscopy, and will guide it to the uterine arteries. Once the tube is in the arteries feeding the fibroids, he will inject small particles which will occlude the blood flow. This will cause the fibroid to shrink over a period of 3-6 months.

    The Overlake Interventional Radiologists have Clinic every Thursday to meet and talk with patients about this procedure. When you schedule we will contact your gynecologist and ask for clinic information and copies of any imaging studies that you’ve had in regards to your fibroids. After your meeting with our physician, we will send you for an MRI and then schedule the procedure once we have the results. You can make this appointment by calling 425-688-5700.

    When your UAE procedure is scheduled

    1. Our scheduler will give you a date and time to be at the hospital.
    2. You will be scheduled to come in two hours before the procedure; this is to allow the admitting staff and the nursing staff to get you ready.
    3. Please let the scheduler know if you take Coumadin, Plavix, Insulin or Metformin. You will need to receive specialized instructions.
    4. Please notify us if you’ve had a previous reaction to contrast dye.
    5. The admitting department will attempt to call you the night before the procedure to confirm your arrival time.
    6. Please plan to leave any jewelry and valuables at home.
    7. Make sure that you have a ride home, and will not be driving yourself.
    8. If you have any questions regarding your procedure you may call us at 425-688-5005.

    Preparation

    1. Do not eat of drink for four hours before your exam.
    2. Please take your normal heart and blood pressure medications with a sip of water.
    3. You need to be at hospital admitting two hours before your procedure’s scheduled start time. This is located at the large desk at the hospital’s main entrance (across from Stanza’s).
    4. Your will be taken down to your room where you will meet your nurse. You will be asked to change into a patient gown, and then an IV will be started and blood will be drawn for lab tests. The nurse will ask you for your medical history. Bring a list of all medications you take and when you take them.
    5. The nurse will also ask you about allergies. If you are allergic to radiology/contrast dye please let them know.
    6. The nurse or tech will be shaving both groin areas.
    7. If there is a possibility that you’re pregnant, please let the nurse know.You will be asked to sign a form if you are at a childbearing age (12-57).
    8. A catheter will be placed into your bladder to drain your urine during the procedure.
    9. You will be asked to sign an informed consent form.
    10. Before the procedure, the interventional nurse will meet with you and your family in your room. They will review your procedure with you and answer any questions you might have.

    Procedure

    1. The procedure takes from one to three hours. You will meet the doctor who will go over the procedure and answer any questions you might still have.
    2. You will receive procedural sedation medication during the procedure to help you relax. At the end of the procedure you might notice the beginning of some abdominal cramping. We will give you pain medication as needed.
    3. During the procedure you might feel warmth, tingling or flushing when you are given the contrast dye. This usually lasts about 10 seconds. Throughout the procedure the nurse will be monitoring your heart, blood pressure and the oxygen level in your blood.
    4. Once the procedure is over you will be transferred back to your room. You may have a small catheter still in place in the artery in your groin.

    After the Procedure

    1. The nurse or tech will remove the small catheter and hold pressure for at least 15 minutes. You will be told to lie flat for up to six hours and to keep your leg straight. This is to prevent any bleeding or swelling.
    2. Your blood pressure, pulse and puncture site will be monitored frequently by the nurse.
    3. Unless your physician has limited your fluid intake, you will be encouraged to drink fluids during your stay.
    4. You will be kept in the hospital for a 24-hour period for observation. During this time the total focus of care will be to control any pain or nausea you may have.
    5. At discharge, the VIR RN will go over your written instructions.
    6. One of the interventional nurses will do a follow-up call the next weekday after your discharge. Write down any questions you might have for them.
    7. To speak with an interventional nurse, please call 425-688-5005. It is best to call between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. You can leave a message on the voicemail, and a nurse will return your call as soon as they are able.
      If you are on Metformin/Glucophage, hold it for 48 hours post procedure. Check with the physician who ordered it for when to restart it. They might request further lab work.
      If you are an insulin-dependent diabetic, restart your regular dosing when you get home. Check your sugar regularly and if you have a concern, contact your diabetes doctor. You may resume taking all of your normal medications once you are home.

    Venogram / Venography

    Venogram / Venography

    A venogram is an X-ray test that takes pictures as the blood flows through the veins in different areas of the body. Radiology dye is put into your veins so they can be seen clearly on an X-ray picture. The Radiologist looks at the condition of your veins and whether there is any clot present.

    A venogram can be done to:

    1. Check the blood flow, the condition of the valves in the veins and to diagnose any strictures or clots.
    2. Find blood clots in the deep veins of your leg, arm or pelvis.
    3. Place a filter to prevent clots going to your lungs.
    4. Place a stent to widely open up the vein.
    5. Draw blood samples around an organ such as the kidney.
    6. Guide the placement of a special intravenous line used for long term medication or fluid treatment.

    When your procedure is scheduled

    1. Our scheduler will give you a date and time to be at the hospital.
    2. You will be scheduled to come in two hours before the procedure; this is to allow the admitting staff and the nursing staff to get you ready.
    3. Please let the scheduler know if you take Coumadin, Plavix, Insulin or Metformin. You will need to receive specialized instructions.
    4. Please notify us if you’ve had a previous reaction to contrast dye.
    5. The admitting department will call you the night before procedure to confirm your arrival time.
    6. Please plan to leave any jewelry and valuables at home.
    7. Make sure that you have a ride home and will not be driving yourself.
    8. If you have any questions regarding your procedure you may call us at 425-688-5507.

    Preparation

    1. Do not eat of drink for four hours before your exam.
    2. Please take your normal heart and blood pressure medications with a sip of water.
    3. You need to be at hospital admitting two hours before you procedure’s scheduled start time. This is located at the large desk at the hospital’s main entrance (across from Stanza’s).
    4. Your will be taken down to your room where you will meet your nurse. You will be asked to change into a patient gown, and then an IV will be started and blood will be drawn for lab tests. The nurse will ask you for your medical history. Bring a list of all medications you take and when you take them.
    5. The nurse will also ask you about allergies. If you are allergic to radiology/contrast dye please let them know.
    6. The nurse or tech will be shaving both groin areas.
    7. If there is a possibility that you’re pregnant, please let the nurse know.You will be asked to sign a form if you are at a childbearing age (12-57).
    8. Before the procedure, the interventional nurse will meet with you and your family in your room. They will review your procedure with you and answer any questions you might have.

    Procedure

    1. The procedure takes from one to three hours. You will meet the doctor who will go over the consent form and answer any questions you might still have.
    2. You will receive sedation medication during the procedure to help you relax.
    3. During the procedure you might feel warmth, tingling or flushing when you are given the contrast dye. This usually lasts about 10 seconds. During the procedure the nurse will be monitoring your heart, blood pressure and the oxygen level in your blood.
    4. Once the procedure is over you will be transferred back to your room.

    After the Procedure

    1. If the small catheter in your vein hasn’t been removed, the nurse or tech will remove it and hold pressure for at least 10 to 15 minutes. You will be told to lie flat for up to two hours and to keep your leg straight. This is to prevent any bleeding or swelling.
    2. Your blood pressure, pulse and puncture site will be monitored frequently by the nurse.
    3. You will be encouraged to drink plenty of fluids to help wash the contrast dye out of your system. You will need to continue to drink fluids for the first 24 hours after your procedure, unless your physician has limited your fluid intake.
    4. Most patients will be discharged about six hours after procedure.
    5. You will be given written instructions and a phone number to call if you have any questions or concerns.
    6. One of the interventional nurses will do a follow-up call the next weekday after your procedure. Write down any questions you might have for them.
    7. To speak with an interventional nurse, please call 425-688-5005. It is best to call between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. You can leave a message on the voicemail and a nurse will return your call as soon as they are able.
    8. If you are on Coumadin and have been told not to take it before your procedure, you need to check with your physician and/or the Anti-Coagulation Clinic for specific instructions.
      If you are on Metformin/Glucophage, hold it for 48 hours post procedure. Check with the physician who ordered it for when to restart it. They may request further lab work.
      If you are an insulin-dependent diabetic, restart your regular dosing when you get home. Check your sugar regularly and if you have a concern, contact your diabetes doctor.

    Vertebroplasty / Kyphoplasty

    Vertebroplasty / Kyphoplasty

    Vertebroplasty is a pain treatment for vertebral compression fractures that fail to respond to conventional medical therapy (pain medications, physical therapy). Vertebroplasty is a procedure where the Neuro-Radiologist/Interventional Radiologist injects medical bone cement into the fractured vertebra, using X-ray guidance. This stabilizes the collapsed vertebra, prevents further collapse and improves pain. The most common reason for these fractures is osteoporosis. Multiple fractures, if untreated, can cause loss of height and spine curvature.

    Kyphoplasty is a treatment, combined with Vertebroplasty, in which orthopedic balloons are used to gently raise the collapsed vertebra in an attempt to return them to the correct position.

    Before the procedure is scheduled, your own doctor will send you for imaging to diagnosis the fracture. MRI is desired because the radiologist can identify swelling, age of fracture and if there are any bone fragments near the spinal canal. If you have a metal implant, such as a pacemaker, and MRI cannot be used you will be sent for a nuclear bone scan.

    When your procedure is scheduled

    1. Our scheduler will give you a date and time to be at the hospital.
    2. You will be scheduled to come in two hours before the procedure; this is to allow the admitting staff and the nursing staff to get you ready.
    3. Please let the scheduler know if you take Coumadin, Plavix, Insulin or Metformin. You will need specialized instructions.
    4. Please notify us if you’ve had a previous reaction to contrast dye.
    5. The admitting department will call you the night before the procedure to confirm your arrival time.
    6. Please plan to leave any jewelry and valuables at home.
    7. Make sure that you have a ride home and will not be driving yourself.
    8. If you have any questions regarding your procedure you may call us at 425-688-5507.

    Preparation

    1. Do not eat of drink for four hours before your exam.
    2. Please take your normal heart and blood pressure medications with a sip of water. You may also take your pain medications with a sip of water.
    3. You need to be at hospital admitting two hours before you procedure’s scheduled start time. This is located at the large desk at the hospital’s main entrance (across from Stanza’s).
    4. Your will be taken down to your room where you will meet your nurse. You will be asked to change into a patient gown, and then an IV will be started and blood will be drawn for lab tests. The nurse will ask you for your medical history. Bring a list of all the medications you take and when you take them.
    5. The nurse will also ask you about allergies. If you are allergic to radiology/contrast dye please let them know.
    6. If you need pain medication for your back please let the nurse know.
    7. If there is a possibility that you’re pregnant, please let the nurse know.You will be asked to sign a form if you are at a childbearing age (12-57).
    8. Before the procedure, the interventional nurse will meet with you and your family in your room. They will review your procedure with you and answer any questions you might have.

    Procedure

    1. The procedure takes from one to three hours. You will meet the doctor who will go over the consent form and answer any questions you might still have.
    2. You will receive sedation medication during the procedure to help you relax.
    3. You will be positioned on your stomach. Pain medication will be provided if needed. Your face will be placed inside a massage pillow to keep your back properly aligned.
    4. During the procedure the nurse will be monitoring your heart, blood pressure and the oxygen level in your blood.
    5. Once the procedure is over you will be transferred back to your room lying flat on your back.

    After the Procedure

    1. You will stay on your back for about an hour. This is to let the cement harden.
    2. Your blood pressure, pulse and pain level will be monitored frequently.
    3. Once you are more awake and sitting up, we will provide you with a meal and fluids of your choice.
    4. Most patients will be discharged about three to five hours after the procedure.
    5. You will be given written instructions and a phone number to call if you have any questions or concerns.
    6. One of the interventional nurses will do a follow-up call the next weekday after your procedure. Write down any questions you might have for them.
    7. To speak with an interventional nurse, please call 425-688-5005. It is best to call between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. You can leave a message on the voicemail and a nurse will return your call as soon as they are able.
    8. If you are on Coumadin and have been told not to take it before your procedure, you need to check with your physician and/or the Anti-Coagulation Clinic for specific instructions.

      If you are an insulin-dependent diabetic, restart your regular dosing when you get home. Check your sugar regularly and if you have a concern, contact your diabetes doctor.
    9. You will have at least two bandages on your back and you may remove them the next day.
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